bypasses

OWS, Month 3


The accelerating Occupy Movement is freely developing of its own momentum. Not only have occupations proliferated around the globe, but as the occupations gain mass they’re increasingly throwing off satellites.

One such satellite is The New School Free Press’s occupation of a building owned by Wells Fargo, an action which continues Occupy Wall Street’s novel focus on private institutions:

“As we are continually and violently pushed out of public spaces, the people of this city must find new spaces in which to foster dialogue, learn and engage politically. Private spaces must be liberated; the movement must expand. We students, educators and members of the broader public have come together to occupy this space, seeking to transform it into a place of public education, safe and open to all.

“Much of the repression of this movement has been conducted under the pretense of public health and safety. We, the occupiers, declare that our primary concern lies in the safety and well-being of this occupation and its participants. New School President David Van Zandt and the New School Administration have expressed concerns that we observe the building?s fire code. We share these concerns. Licensed fire guards are included among the occupiers and we will continue to take the necessary steps to prevent harm from coming to anyone.

“We reiterate that this occupation is not a New School action; this building actually belongs to Wells Fargo, whose role in the current economic crisis is well-known. We are occupying a building: and we, as occupiers, are not solely students ? we are workers, teachers, students, unemployed, under-employed, indebted and exploited. We are creating a common space that will eventually be open to all. In addition to the people?s university, the CUNY adjunct project, and the all-city student assembly, we are in the process of planning a series of open teach-ins and events. Schedule forthcoming.”

Viewpoint Magazine continued their excellent coverage of the movement this week with an article that examines and welcomes the shift toward deeper decentralization. Is there a limit to this reduction in scale?

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Filed under: activism, education, movements, , ,

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